Cannabinoid Label and Accurate Dose

CANNABINOID LABEL AND ACCURATE DOSE

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As the use of cannabis (marijuana) for medical purposes has expanded, a variety of edible products for oral consumption has been developed. An estimated 16% to 26% of patients using medical cannabis consume edible products. Even though oral consumption lacks the harmful by-products of smoking, difficult dose titration can result in overdosing or underdosing, highlighting the importance of accurate product labeling.

Regulation and quality assurance for edible product cannabinoid content and labeling are generally lacking. We investigated the label accuracy of edible cannabis products.


Curcumin Nanoparticles

CURCUMIN NANOPARTICLES

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Curcumin [(E,E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-ione]  is the main phenolic pigment extracted from turmeric, the powdered rhizome of Curcuma longa, along with demethoxy curcumin and bisdemethoxy curcumin.

It is commonly used as a spice, food preservative, and flavoring and coloring agent. Extensive research over the last 5 decades indicates that curcumin possesses potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, anti-HIV, and antimicrobial properties.


Cannabinoids As Novel Anti-inflammatory Drugs

CANNABINOIDS AS NOVEL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS

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Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors.


Cannabidiol for Prevention of GVHD

CANNABIDIOL FOR PREVENTION OF GVHD

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Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We hypothesized that CBD may decrease GVHD incidence and severity after alloHCT.

We conducted a phase II study.


Cannabidiol: A Potential Treatment for Post-Ebola

CANNABIDIOL: A POTENTIAL TREATMENT FOR POST EBOLA

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Patients recovered from Ebola virus infection may experience short- and long-term physical, neuropsychological and social sequelae, including arthralgia, musculoskeletal pain, ophthalmic inflammation, auditory problems, fatigue, confusion, insomnia, short-term memory impairment, anxiety, depression and anorexia, all lasting from two weeks to more than two years.

Currently there are no treatments for post Ebola sequelae. We hypothesize that cannabidiol (CBD) may attenuate some of these post Ebola sequelae, several of which have been postulated to result from inflammation and/or an autoimmune response.